Archive:Past Webinars

Inflammation, Temperature and Therapeutics

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Dr. Hollander’s research group has examined the underlying mechanisms of a fever response and involvement of the immune-inflammatory system in ASD via four approaches:  1. Oxytocin vs placebo in ASD: (oxytocin not only has potent effects on social cognition and lower order repetitive behaviors but also has effects on obesity and wound healing; clinical response may be magnified in syndromal forms of ASD – tuberous sclerosis and Prader Willi Syndrome), 2. Hyperthermia: children with ASD are compared at temperatures of 102 degrees vs 98 degrees on clinical measures, biomarkers, and gene expression profiling, 3. LC/NE function as an outcome of maternal stress is examined by a milnacipran vs placebo trial of ASD, 4. TSO (trichura suis ova; a helminth) vs placebo is examined in adult ASD on clinical measures and biomarkers.


Published: 09/18/2013 Length: 01:17:53

Eric Hollander Eric Hollander, M.D.

Dr. Hollander is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Director of the Autism and Obsessive Compulsive Spectrum Program at Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Previously he served as the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and Chair of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and was Director of the Seaver and NY Autism Center of Excellence in New York City. Before then he served as Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. Dr. Hollander received his B.A. from Brandeis University (1978), and his M.D. from SUNY Downstate Medical College, Brooklyn (1982). He completed his internship in Internal Medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital (1983), residency and chief resident in psychiatry at Mt Sinai School of Medicine (1986), and his NIMH research fellowship at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (1988). He has served as an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and as the Esther and Joseph Klingenstein Professor and Chair of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Hollander has served as the principal investigator for a number of federal grants, including the NIH Greater New York Autism Center of Excellence, the NIMH Research Training Grant in Psychopharmacology and Outcomes Research, and an FDA funded multicenter treatment trial of pediatric body dysmorphic disorder. He was the principal investigator of the autism Clinical Trials Network, and Chair of the eight centers NIH STAART Autism Steering Committee. He is involved in research on the neuropharmacology, neuropsychiatry, functional imaging, and treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, impulsive/aggressive personality disorders, obsessive-compulsive-related disorders such as body dysmorphic disorder, pathological gambling, and autism. Dr. Hollander served as Chair of the DSM-V Research Planning Agenda for Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Spectrum Disorders, and member of the DSM-V Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Post-Traumatic and Dissociative Disorders Workgroup, and the Behavioral and Substance Addictions Workgroup. Dr. Hollander has received a Research Scientist Development Award from the National Institute of Mental health to investigate the psychobiology of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. He has received orphan drug grants from the Food and Drug Administration to study new treatments for body dysmorphic disorder, child/adolescent autism, and adult autism, and a grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse for a study on the neurobiology of pathological gambling. He has received several grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, to develop treatments for borderline personality disorder, adolescent body dysmorphic disorder, and autism. Dr. Hollander has received two national research awards from the American Psychiatric Association and a Distinguished Investigator Award from the National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Depression. During his career, Dr. Hollander has published more than 500 scientific publications in the professional literature. He has edited 20 books, including the Textbook of Autism Spectrum Disorders (American Psychiatric Publishing, 2011), the Textbook of Anxiety Disorders (American Psychiatric Publishing, 2002 and 2009 editions), and the Clinical Manual of Impulse Control Disorders (2006). Dr. Hollander is listed for the past ten years in NY Magazine’s and Castle Connolly’s “Best Doctors”, and “Best Doctors in America”. He has made frequent media appearances on the Today Show and Dateline NBC and has had interviews in People Magazine and the New York Times. He is co-author of a book with Marc Summers, Everything In Its Place: My Trials and Triumphs with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Penguin Putnam, 1999) and coauthored with Nick Bakalar, Coping with Social Anxiety: The Definitive Guide to Effective Treatment Options (Henry Holt and Company, 2005).



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